Norway Data

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Since 2020, the EASIE data collection has taken place annually. Before 2020, it took place every two years. The default view below is the most recent school year available.

The data is presented in tables, focusing on different aspects of inclusive education. Unless stated otherwise in the notes, the data displayed is from the selected school year.

Click on the icon in the data tables to open a pop-up window containing the data sources and notes.

The Country Report presents the indicator tables, which are generated from the data in the data tables. The HTML versions of the Country Reports on the webpage are accessible; the PDF downloads are automatically generated and may not be fully accessible. To view the Country Report, click the 'View Country Report' button below.

In all tables, where data is not displayed, the following reasons have been given: ‘M’ for missing data, ‘NA’ where data is not applicable, and ‘NC’ where indicators cannot be calculated.

The ‘Background Information’ questionnaires are completed to give context to the data in the data tables. You can download the background information for the 2012/2013, 2014/2015 and 2016/2017 datasets as PDFs. For all other datasets, use the drop-down menu below.

View Country Report

2018/2019 Data:

Question ISCED 02 ISCED 1 ISCED 2 ISCED 3
Boys: Girls: Total: Boys: Girls: Total: Boys: Girls: Total: Boys: Girls: Total:
1.1 Actual population of children/learners in the typical ISCED age ranges
93,702
89,149
182,851
1.1
232,437
220,381
452,818
1.2
96,557
92,090
188,647
1.3
98,397
92,868
191,265
1.4
1.2 All children/learners enrolled in any form of recognised education
M
M
177,968
2.1
230,282
218,373
448,655
2.2
96,133
91,562
187,695
2.3
90,835
87,042
177,877
2.4
1.3 All children/learners enrolled in mainstream (pre-)schools
M
M
177,931
3.1
M
M
447,984
3.2
M
M
186,959
3.3
M
M
M
1.3a All children/learners educated with their peers in mainstream groups/classes for 80% or more of the time
M
M
M
M
M
446,544
4.2
M
M
185,668
4.3
M
M
M
1.3b All children/learners educated in separate groups/classes, spending less than 80% of the time with their peers in mainstream groups/classes
M
M
M
M
M
1,440
5.2
M
M
1,291
5.3
M
M
M
1.4 All children/learners educated outside of mainstream (pre-)schools
M
M
37
6.1
M
M
671
6.2
M
M
736
6.3
M
M
M
1.4a All children/learners educated in separate special (pre-)schools or units organised by the ministry of education
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
1.4b All children/learners educated in separate special (pre-)schools or units organised by other sectors/ministries
M
M
37
8.1
M
M
671
8.2
M
M
736
8.3
M
M
M
1.4c All children/learners educated in other recognised forms of alternative education
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
1.4d All children/learners educated in recognised forms of home schooling
M
M
M
M
M
184
10.2
M
M
M
10.3
M
M
M
1.5 All children/learners who should, by law, be in some form of recognised education, but who are out of any form of recognised education.
M
M
M
M
M
212
11.2
M
M
M
11.3
M
M
M
Question ISCED 02 ISCED 1 ISCED 2 ISCED 3
Boys: Girls: Total: Boys: Girls: Total: Boys: Girls: Total: Boys: Girls: Total:
2.1 Actual population of children/learners with an official decision of SEN in the typical ISCED age ranges
M
M
8,084
1.1
21,479
9,674
31,153
1.2
12,201
6,401
18,602
1.3
M
M
M
1.4
2.2 All children/learners with an official decision of SEN in any recognised form of education
M
M
8,084
2.1
21,479
9,674
31,153
2.2
12,201
6,401
18,602
2.3
M
M
M
2.3 All children/learners with an official decision of SEN educated in mainstream (pre-)schools
M
M
8,047
3.1
M
M
30,482
3.2
M
M
17,866
3.3
M
M
M
2.3a All children/learners with an official decision of SEN educated with their peers in mainstream groups/classes for 80% or more of the time
M
M
M
M
M
29,042
4.2
M
M
16,575
4.3
M
M
M
4.4
2.3b All children/learners with an official decision of SEN educated in separate groups/classes, spending less than 80% of the time with their peers in mainstream groups/classes
M
M
M
M
M
1,440
5.2
M
M
1,291
5.3
M
M
M
5.4
2.4 All children/learners with an official decision of SEN educated outside of mainstream (pre-)schools
M
M
37
6.1
M
M
671
6.2
M
M
736
6.3
M
M
M
2.4a All children/learners with an official decision of SEN educated in separate special (pre-)schools or units organised by the ministry of education
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
2.4b All children/learners with an official decision of SEN educated in separate special (pre-)schools or units organised by other sectors/ministries
M
M
37
8.1
458
213
671
8.2
473
263
736
8.3
M
M
M
2.4c All children/learners with an official decision of SEN educated in other recognised forms of alternative education
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
2.4d All children/learners with an official decision of SEN educated in recognised forms of home schooling
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
2.5 All children/learners with an official decision of SEN who should, by law, be in some form of recognised education, but who are out of any form of recognised education
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M
M

Norway - Country Background Information

Describing the forms of education in the country

The EASIE data collection covers all recognised forms of education at ISCED levels 02, 1, 2 and 3.

This means any type of education organised by or approved by any recognised educational provider in the public or private sector: municipality, local or regional educational provider from the public or private sector, working with/for ministries responsible for education and areas such as health, social, welfare, labour, justice, etc

What is the compulsory education age range in the country?

6 to 15 years: ISCED 1 and 2.

What are the typical age ranges for the ISCED levels?

ISCED LEVEL 02 ISCED LEVEL 1 ISCED LEVEL 2 ISCED LEVEL 3
3-5 6-12 13-15 16-18
Is private sector education covered by the data provided for the country?
Yes

Private sector is understood as private primary and secondary schools approved under the Private Education Act Section 2-1 or the Education Act Section 2-12.

Running private primary and secondary schools is not permitted in Norway without this approval.

Is recognised public or private education organised by sectors other than education (i.e. health, social, welfare, labour, justice, etc.) in the data provided for the country?
No
Are there recognised forms of alternative education covered by the data provided for the country?
No
Are there recognised forms of home schooling covered by the data provided for the country?
Yes

The number of children receiving home education is also counted. This is regulated in the Education Act.

Identifying an ‘inclusive setting’ in the country

In the EASIE data collection, an inclusive setting is operationally defined as:

A recognised form of education where the child/learner follows education in mainstream classes alongside their peers for the largest part – 80% or more – of the school week.

The 80% time placement benchmark clearly indicates that a child/learner is educated in a mainstream class for the majority of their school week. At the same time, it acknowledges possibilities for small group or one-to-one withdrawal for limited periods of time (i.e. 20% or one day a week).

Very few participating countries can provide exact data on children/learners spending 80% of their time in a mainstream group/class. However, all countries can apply one of three agreed proxies that provide an approximation to this benchmark:

  • Placement in a mainstream class implies over 80% or more
  • Data is available on the number of hours of support allocated to a child/learner
  • Placement in a mainstream class implies over 50% or more.

 

Are you able to provide actual data to verify the 80% placement benchmark?
No
What an ‘official decision of SEN’ means in the country

In the EASIE data collection, the agreed operational definition is:

An official decision leads to a child/learner being recognised as eligible for additional educational support to meet their learning needs.

Countries may have different types of official decision, but for all official decisions:

  • There has been some form of educational assessment procedure involving different people. This procedure may involve the child/learner, parents, school-based team members, as well as professionals from multi-disciplinary teams from outside the child’s/learner’s (pre-)school.
  • There is some form of legal document (plan/programme, etc.) that describes the support the child/learner is eligible to receive, which is used as the basis for decision-making.
  • There is some form of regular review process of the child/learner’s needs, progress and support.

 

Please describe what an ‘official decision’ is in the country.

Data is available on the number of pupils receiving special needs education on a one-to-one basis with a teacher or teaching assistant or in small groups outside mainstream classes. Most of these pupils spend more than 80% of their time in mainstream classes, but there are no exact numbers on this. The right for Special Education is found in chapter 5 in the Education Act. 

Pupils who either do not or are unable to benefit satisfactorily from ordinary teaching have the right to special education. In assessing what kind of instruction to provide, particular emphasis is placed on the pupil’s developmental prospects. 

The content of the courses offered will allow the pupil to receive adequate benefit from the tuition as a whole in relation to other pupils and in relation to educational objectives that are realistic for the pupil. Pupils who receive special education shall have the same total number of teaching hours as other pupils.

What educational assessment procedures are carried out and who is involved?

Before the municipality or the county authority makes a decision on whether the pupil should receive special education or not, an expert assessment is made of the pupil’s specific needs. The assessment is provided by the educational and psychological counselling service. This assessment determines whether the pupil needs special education, and what kind of instruction should be provided. 

The expert assessment considers and determines the following: 

  • the pupil’s learning outcome from the ordinary educational provisions;
  • learning difficulties the pupil has, and other special conditions of importance to education; 
  • realistic educational objectives for the pupil; 
  • whether it is possible to provide help for the pupil’s difficulties within the ordinary educational provisions; 
  • what kind of instruction it is appropriate to provide.

The Education Act does not regulate multi-disciplinary teams, but it does regulate the educational psychology service (PPT), an expert body exernal to the pupil’s school. The Act states that the service is responsible for producing expert assessments where the law demands it, both in respect of school pupils and children under compulsory school age. The service also has a statutory responsibility to contribute towards the development of competencies and organisational development in schools.

What formal, regular review processes of a child/learner’s needs, progress and support are linked to an official decision?

Once every year, the school prepares a written summary of the education received by the pupil and an assessment of the pupil’s development. The pupil’s development must be assessed on the basis of the aims stipulated in the pupil’s individual curriculum. The school sends this summary and the assessment to the pupil or to the pupil’s parents and to the municipality or county authority.

What ‘out-of-education’ means in the country

Within the EASIE data collection, specific questions examine children/learners who are out of education. This means children/learners who should, by law, be in some form of recognised education, but who are out of any form of recognised education. A recognised form of education is any type of education organised by or approved by any recognised educational provider in the public or private sector.

Is there a formal definition of ‘out-of-education’ in the country?
Yes

Pupils who are considered out of education have not met compulsory primary education at school and are outside school on 1 October. Pupils with documented absences or pupils who have moved out of the country are not counted.

Please describe which learners are considered ‘out-of-education’ in the country

Pupils who are considered out of education have not met compulsory primary education at school and are outside school on 1 October. Pupils with documented absences or pupils who have moved out of the country are not counted.

Please describe any specific country issues you think are relevant for understanding the data you have provided

About the 80% placement benchmark: Data is available on the number of pupils receiving special needs education on a one-to-one basis with a teacher or teaching assistant or in small groups outside mainstream classes. Most of these pupils spend more than 80% of their time in mainstream classes, but there are no exact numbers on this. The best proxy that could be found is the number of pupils affiliated with a dedicated special needs unit in mainstream schools.

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